December’s Member Spotlight: Chris Brown

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BEFORE

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AFTER

My relationship with Infinity Fitness AZ was initiated by Scottsdale Soccer ‘Blackhawks’. The Blackhawks is the largest soccer Club in Arizona and we wanted to find a speed, agility and strength organization to align our training for the children in our Club. I was immediately impressed with Chase, Heather and Mike – their knowledge and their care.

I started working out at the facility this summer and committed to the Fitness Challenge this past September. My goal for the Fitness Challenge was to lose over 20 lbs and the commitment was simple from Chase and Heather – commit to the facility three times a week and follow the eating and supplement plan. Three things really helped motivate me – My Fitness Pal is a great tool to hold you accountable and to give you a sense of your intake, the wall of either achievement or shame – depending on your outlook in life – was both humbling and motivating, and the 6am class is always a fun group to remind you if you start off course! Members who have completed previous challenges are also a great resource to help you particularly with nutritional ideas.

Through the experience I reached out to Chase and Heather a couple of times and they gave me great feedback and aside from being disciplined and accountable to myself, I simply followed the plan outlined. I ended up losing 22 lbs through the challenge and 4.3% in body fat.

If you are thinking of doing it in January, don’t hesitate – it is great fun, very motivating and for myself life changing.

Hiking in the Phoenix Area

Yes its December and Yes it is in the 70’s. GET OUTSIDE

It’s that time of year where it feels like the entire country decides to live here for a couple months, and with good reason. They love it here because the weather is fantastic. We’re lucky to live somewhere where winter means mid 70’s and sun. Get outside, enjoy it and get some exercise in at the same time. Here are some great hiking spots just a short drive from Infinity:

Piestewa (Squaw) Peak
Piestewa (Squaw) Peak
Level: Moderate
Distance: 2.0 miles
Time: 1-3 hours
Camelback Mountain
Camelback Mountain
Level: difficult
Distance: 2.2 Miles
Time: 1-3 hours
Shaw Butte with Towers
Shaw Butte with towers
Level: moderate
Distance: 4.5 miles
Time: 1-3 hours
Tom’s Thumb
Tom's Thumb, North Side

Level: moderate

Distance 3.7 miles
Time:1-3 hours
Feel free to share your favorite trails in the comments. See you out there!

Mike Sheahan

Reflect. And Set New Goals.

Member Spotlight: The Aisters

My husband and I have always been active people. We’ve been members at a variety of different gyms throughout our entire adult life and thought of ourselves as healthy and in good shape. Three (+) years ago, a dear friend of ours introduced us to Chase Noll & Heather Weber. Our lives have been forever changed! Beginning our new health journey, we started with the Fit Challenge. The Challenge taught us how to make healthier choices, beginning with our diet and extending to our daily work out regimens. Chase, Heather, and the Infinity Fitness team are clearly educated and expert on implementing diet and fitness excellence.

Aister

Many years ago, my husband suffered a significant knee injury causing limited mobility with an enormous amount of degeneration. Our concern about joining a gym with such an intense program, was quickly eliminated by both Chase and Heather. Both have been wonderful with providing safe modifications that keep him active and involved with group training. Our exercise and overall health have significantly improved because of Chase and Heather. We have maintained weight reduction goals and improved our exercise technique.

The staff at Infinity Fitness is simply amazing. They treat us like family and greet us with a warm smile every day. The friendships we have developed with other members are as special as Chase and Heather.   Exercising in an environment where all participants encourage each other makes Infinity Fitness exceptional and unique. We are grateful to be a part of this fitness family!

Dr. and Mrs. Kevin J. Aister

Train like an athlete

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We’ve all seen them: the guy who looks like the Incredible Hulk yet can’t lift a thing, or on the contrary, a guy that looks like a complete slob but can lift a house. Or what about the guy that looks great, but can’t walk up a flight of stairs without needing CPR at the top? No matter what your age or gender, I recommend training like an athlete.

How do you train like an athlete? 

     1. Join us at Infinity Fitness.

2. Increase your work capacity (work capacity= the ability to repeat high QUALITY effort).

The higher your work capacity then the more prepared for training you are; the more prepared you are the more work you can do; the more work you can do the more gains you can achieve. (Gains can mean very different things!  For women look at it as *leans* ). To achieve this, shorten your rest times between sets, run stairs (hint,hint), throw cardio into the middle of a workout, do some ploy metrics. It’s not 1982 Golds Gym thinking is 2014 Infinity thinking to keep the heart rate up and continuously move throughout the workout. Maximize your time in the gym to maximize your feeling outside of it.

     3. Create or find variety in your workouts.

Find a gym that is not typical. Switch things up daily, don’t get stuck in a rut and move your body in every direction with resistance daily. Your mind and body wants to be pushed and needs to be pushed to create a healthier lifestyle. As they say variety is the spice of life, so spice that thing up!!!

     4. Enjoy and embrace the push this type of training gives you.

Have fun. Working out has the word “work” which most people despise. But…..and a big one, it’s not work if you love it. As crazy as this sounds, it really is fun to…

  • Leave a pool of sweat
  • Stumble out of the gym after leg day
  • Have to catch your breath during a workout
  • Want to quit but continue
  • REALLY want to quit but give it just that little bit you have left
  • Hi-five someone that just killed their workout
  • Be the one who got the hi-five
  • Feel better about yourself

Mike Sheahan, CPT, PES

Can’t Means Won’t

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“I CAN’T!”

No two words bother me more as a Fitness Professional than those two. They are the reason some people stop reaching their goals, and they are the reason some people never begin working toward theirs. That phrase is one of the most defeating, self-deflating, unproductive sentences of all time. In short, I despise it. Especially when a majority of the time it comes prior to even attempting the action.

My 7th grade English Teacher Mr. Lingenfelter had a phrase “Can’t Means Won’t” that has always stuck with me. He was always big on inspiration and humanitarian stories about overcoming tragedies (Ryan White, Ponyboy from The Outsiders, Space Shuttle Challenger). He would give us an assignment sometimes a little beyond our middle school abilities just to see how we would approach it. No matter what it was, there would be a small group of people who would respond with “I can’t do this, it’s too much work/too hard/too many words.” He had the simple response of “Can’t Means Won’t.” At the time I thought it was a really stupid reply because ultimately the person making the excuse ended in the same place, being crushed under the assignment’s expectations. But it always stuck with me, and I never truly understood the meaning until I started working with kids, and training adults, and started hearing the phrase more and more often. I wasn’t asking for difficult tasks, just something that would be challenging.

That’s when it hit me, it’s not so much the end result, because ultimately we all have different capabilities, but it was about not allowing our mindset to handicap us before we even tried. The difference between “I can’t” and “I won’t” is so much bigger than my middle school mind could process at the time. It’s a matter of perspective and how you view obstacles. If there is something in the way of your goal, do you work to find a way around/through/over or do you turn tail and say “That’s not going to happen.” Ultimately the choice is on the individual some people see obstacles, some people see opportunities. It’s all about your mindset, being open minded and being committed to your goals.

Chase Noll, CPT

Creating a S.M.A.R.T. Goal

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We all learned in Elementary school the method of creating “S.M.A.R.T.” goals, but may have forgotten this method as an adult. This is a perfect way to create a really good fitness goal! Put your goal somewhere for you to see every day as a reminder, post your goal on Social Media, tell everyone about your goals and ask them to hold you accountable! You’ll have a much better chance at accomplishing your goal if you don’t hide it to yourself.

Specific– Instead of creating a general goal, such as “I want to be in the best shape of my life”, make it as specific as possible. Your goal should answer the following “W” questions:

  • Who: Who is involved?
  • What: What do I want to accomplish?
  • Where: Identify a location.
  • When: Establish a time frame.
  • Which: Identify requirements and constraints.
  • Why: Specific reasons, purpose or benefits of accomplishing the goal.

Measurable– You should be able to measure progress toward your goal. Don’t just step on the scale and use that as your only criteria; take body measurements with a tape measure, and also have your body fat taken. Re-assess every 3-4 weeks with these more specific measurements so you can see your progress. This will help keep you on track, stay motivated, and also will give you a sense of accomplishment to keep pushing you toward the end result.

Attainable– Make your goal something that you’re passionate about. This is YOUR goal, not someone else’s, so it has to have significant meaning to you. Believe it or not, if you set your heart on a goal, you will become emotionally attached to it and find a way (no matter how hard it is!) to achieve your goal. If you try to attain a goal that someone else has given you, you’re less likely to stick to it. Your list of goals, endeavors and desires will shape your self-image; you will develop characteristics and personality that will allow you to achieve these goals if you’re passionate about them.

Realistic– Your goal must be something that you are willing and able to work toward. No goal is too high, but if it’s so far out of reach you might be setting yourself up for disappointment. However, on the flip side of things, if you set a goal too low you will more than likely have an apathetic attitude if you don’t achieve it. You need to set yourself a goal that you can measure your progress along the way and still see the end result.

Timely– Give your goal a time stamp. Create a sense of urgency, create “deadlines” just as you would at work! Your goal will be realistic if you don’t just say “someday I will be in the best shape of my life.” Create a plan to dedicate yourself to your goals. You can start with a short term goal, for example you want to lose 8 pounds this month, lose 30 pounds by the New Year, while your long term goal is to lose 100 pounds this year.

T can also mean Tangible. When your goal is tangible, your goal is more likely to be specific, measureable, and thus attainable!

Goal setting can be overwhelming when you have so many you want to achieve. Write everything down that you want to accomplish, break them down into smaller goals, create a game plan for each one and this will make the light at the end of the tunnel a lot closer. And when you start to think about giving up on your goals, always remember why you started!

Heather Weber, NASM CPT, CES